Seed Stitch vs Moss Stitch vs Irish Moss Stitch vs Double Moss Stitch

Seed Stitch vs Moss Stitch.jpg

When I very first started knitting I was very confused as to the differences between:

  1. seed stitch
  2. moss stitch
  3. single seed stitch
  4. single moss stitch
  5. double moss stitch
  6. Irish moss stitch

I had good reason to be confused, as there are only three stitches, but six names. After a good deal of research, I have managed to find the differences between the three stitches, and I have an opinion as to what are good names for them.

The problem with these three stitches is that no one can decide on what’s a good name for them, and will argue over it. That leads to finding a tutorial on the moss stitch and someone saying that it’s actually the seed stitch. Then you look up other tutorials for the moss stitch and end up finding the Irish moss stitch, which another person calls the double moss stitch.

I hope to be able to clarify the difference between these three stitches, and demonstrate how to knit each of them.

Notation I’ll be using in this blog post:

  • K1: Knit 1 stitch
  • P1: Purl 1 stitch
  • K2: Knit 2 stitches
  • P2: Purl 2 stitches
  • * *: Repeat whatever is in the asterisks

Seed Stitch

seed01.jpg

The seed stitch follows this pattern:

  • 1st row: * K1, P1 *; repeat until the end of the row
  • Repeat 1st row to form the pattern

This is sometimes also called a moss stitch, single seed stitch, and single moss stitch. I prefer to call this stitch the seed stitch, as it seems to be universally recognized as such, and the two other stitches are never called the seed stitch.

The seed stitch has a bumpy texture, and I think it’s perfect for winter clothing and accessories.

Double Moss Stitch

doubleMoss01.jpg

The double moss stitch often follows this pattern:

  • 1st row: * K2, P2 *; repeat until the end of the row
  • 2nd row: * K2, P2 *; repeat until the end of the row
  • 3rd row: * P2, K2 *; repeat until the end of the row
  • 4th row: * P2, K2 *; repeat until the end of the row
  • Repeat rows 1 through 4 to form the pattern

I don’t believe I have ever heard this referred to by any other name, but once you read about the Irish moss stitch, you will understand my confusion.

The double moss stitch is very boxy, and would look good on a vest or cardigan.

Irish Moss Stitch

irishMoss01.jpg

The Irish moss stitch follows this pattern:

  • 1st row: * K1, P1 *; repeat until the end of the row
  • 2nd row: * K1, P1 *; repeat until the end of the row
  • 3rd row: * P1, K1 *; repeat until the end of the row
  • 4th row: * P1, K1 *; repeat until the end of the row
  • Repeat rows 1 through 4 to form the pattern

This is where I was getting thrown off as I have heard the Irish moss stitch also referred to as the moss stitch, and the double moss stitch. I prefer the Irish moss stitch for naming, as it leaves no confusion about whether it is really a seed stitch or a double moss stitch.

The Irish moss stitch has a very unique texture, and I think it would be lovely for a tasseled scarf, or a simple headband.

3 stitches, 6 names, and a whole lot of confusion. But hopefully that confusion has been resolved. My favorite stitch out of the three is the seed stitch, let me know what your favorite is in the comments.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s